L.A’s Local Natives at Stage AE; Jergel’s Hosts Totally 80’s (Sat., 3/18/17)

1) Years before Katy Perry’s Super Bowl halftime show made Left Shark a meme, Local Natives casted a shark in the music video for “Wide Eyes.” A red-eyed koala also makes an appearance. Perhaps the local fauna is why the Australian Democrats used the song in an election campaign ad. The ad helped the indie rock quintet, who are from Silver Lake, Los Angeles, California, get known Down Under. (Fame will find you in the most interesting ways sometimes.) “Wide Eyes” is off the band’s debut, Gorilla Manor, which takes its name from a messy Orange County house that the members shared. (We’ve all lived, or at least partied, in a “gorilla manor” during our lives, particularly between the ages of 19 and 26.) Local Natives are big in their native U.S. with tour dates to prove it, including one at Stage AE. Their latest album is 2016’s Sunlit Youth. Little Scream open. Doors open 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Dr., North Shore. (CM)

2) Have a fun retro flashback (or, depending on your age, discover new music) with Totally 80’s belting out the best hits of the decade at Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. Bring your Motley Crew or even “Jessie’s Girl” and have some fun. 9 p.m. 285 Northgate dr., Warrendale.

In the 1700s, before picture postcards, wealthy travelers bought paintings as mementos. Francesco Guardi's "View on the Grand Canal at San Geremia, Venice" (1760-65) wound up many years later in the collection of Henry Clay Frick.

In the 1700s, before picture postcards, wealthy travelers bought paintings as mementos. Francesco Guardi’s “View on the Grand Canal at San Geremia, Venice” (1760-65) wound up many years later in the collection of Henry Clay Frick.

3) Some reasons to visit the Frick Art Museum in Point Breeze: Admission is free. The classically designed building is an elegant, yet intimate, venue for the museum’s pre-modern art—early Renaissance religious paintings, portraits and fanciful scenes by old European masters, exotic vases and furniture. And the current exhibit, titled The Frick Collects: From Rubens to Monet, adds another historical dimension. The artworks are arranged, along with well-written text panels, to give glimpses into the lives and times of the individuals who collected them: industrialist Henry Clay Frick and his daughter Helen Clay Frick. Hard-driving Henry was a leading (and controversial) figure in the American steel industry of the late 1800s to early 1900s. He was also one of the country’s first notable art collectors, with daughter Helen then becoming his principal torch-bearer. So The Frick Collects gives you a sort of double-dip view—intriguing art, plus insights into the one-percenters of a tumultuous era—and two more free attractions are right nearby: the Frick Pittsburgh’s Car and Carriage Museum and the Visitor Center, with a well-stocked reading room. See our review for details on all. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. 7227 Reynolds Ave., Point Breeze. (MV)