Pittsburgh Earth Day 2020 (Wed., 4/22/20)

"The Blue Marble" is a famous photograph of the Earth taken on December 7, 1972, by the crew of the Apollo 17 spacecraft en route to the Moon at a distance of about 29,000 kilometres (18,000 mi). It shows Africa, Antarctica, and the Arabian Peninsula. (photo: NASA and Wikipedia).

“The Blue Marble” is a famous photograph of the Earth taken on December 7, 1972, by the crew of the Apollo 17 spacecraft en route to the Moon at a distance of about 29,000 kilometres (18,000 mi). It shows Africa, Antarctica, and the Arabian Peninsula. (photo: NASA and Wikipedia).

This year’s Earth day is going to be a very memorable one, and for all the wrong reasons. Coronavirus is ravaging most of the United States and other nations around the world, while pollution is once again on the rise over the last several years. Endangered animals are being killed so their body parts can be used for “medicinal purposes.” We need a solution! We are the solution!

There are many sources of information on how to lessen our environmental footprint. The Earth Day Challenge by Earth Day Global Network lists 22 days of activities that each of us can do to improve the environment.

In Pittsburgh most of the big annual events that are held each year for Earth Day have been moved to August. There are still some virtual events happening now including online documentaries, Hollywood feature films, family-oriented movies; virtual tours and online activities; plant-based recipe contests; and recycled design and garden challenges. For more information visit the Pittsburgh Earth Day website.

Another uplifting Pittsburgh Earth Day 2020 accomplishment is the recording of  pop/rocker Melanie’s song “Lay Down (Candles in the Rain)” by top local musicians. The song was very popular during the original Earth Day 50 years ago. It is available to stream or download. (See our story).

Earth Day is a day of hope that envisions what more we can achieve for our planet and ourselves. The coronavirus has temporarily given us a glimpse of what less pollution looks like—clearer skies around the globe, even in Los Angeles.